THE QUEUE PROJECT

All the world's a net! And all the data in it merely packets
come to store-and-forward in the queues a while and then are heard no more.
'Tis a network waiting to be switched!

(Vint Cerf, co-author of TCP-IP protocol)

Queues are one of the fundamental architectural principles of all networks. They are infinite and stochastic and yet utterly controllable. Queues are a distribution technology: they are a resource for sharing, smoothing the striations that form at thresholds, and producing a serialised form of justice that, oddly, in a time of real time and swarming technologies seems to be spreading virally. Queues are not merely technical, they cut across all dimensions and in every direction, moving seamlessly from management to morality and back again, capturing the motion of the multitude and directing it into a sequence. Utterly implicated in the regimes of abundance that dominate network life, queues raise both technical and cultural questions about the 'informationalisation' of both media and architecture.

The queue project considers queue architecture from a technocultural perspective and meditates on the politics and rhetorics of regimes of mobility, immobility and the evolving configurations of movement itself. This project is data driven, comprising: still images and video of waiting lines at key thresholds, such as train stations and bus stops; audio recordings of call centre IVRS (interactive voice recordings); people’s stories of experiences in queues, and visualisation of data in various formats.

ongoing...

Latest publication for Queue project is in The Routledge Handbook of Mobilities Adey, Bissell, Hannam, Merriman, Sheller (eds) London, Routledge, 2013 http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415667715/

Images by Gillian Fuller

THE QUEUE PROJECT

All the world's a net! And all the data in it merely packets
come to store-and-forward in the queues a while and then are heard no more.
'Tis a network waiting to be switched!

(Vint Cerf, co-author of TCP-IP protocol)

Queues are one of the fundamental architectural principles of all networks. They are infinite and stochastic and yet utterly controllable. Queues are a distribution technology: they are a resource for sharing, smoothing the striations that form at thresholds, and producing a serialised form of justice that, oddly, in a time of real time and swarming technologies seems to be spreading virally. Queues are not merely technical, they cut across all dimensions and in every direction, moving seamlessly from management to morality and back again, capturing the motion of the multitude and directing it into a sequence. Utterly implicated in the regimes of abundance that dominate network life, queues raise both technical and cultural questions about the 'informationalisation' of both media and architecture.

The queue project considers queue architecture from a technocultural perspective and meditates on the politics and rhetorics of regimes of mobility, immobility and the evolving configurations of movement itself. This project is data driven, comprising: still images and video of waiting lines at key thresholds, such as train stations and bus stops; audio recordings of call centre IVRS (interactive voice recordings); people’s stories of experiences in queues, and visualisation of data in various formats.

ongoing...

Latest publication for Queue project is in The Routledge Handbook of Mobilities Adey, Bissell, Hannam, Merriman, Sheller (eds) London, Routledge, 2013 http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415667715/

Images by Gillian Fuller