PROJECT iD

Gillian Fuller and Lynne Roberts Goodwin

Supported through 2010 FASS/COFA, UNSW, Faculty Research Grant

‘To what aesthetic regime should one submit?’

In this project we approach this question by focusing on the passport photograph. If W.G Sebald was right, and the passport is the most egregious oppression of modernity (Torpey 2000), what part does the photograph – the aesthetic – play in this act of oppression?

How does this aesthetic operate and how does it shape the way states ‘see’ citizens and citizens ‘see’ themselves? Importantly, the passport photo is also the beginning of biometrics: identity in data (iD). So, moving from the traditional (analogue) passport photo we need to examine how our ‘selves’ are coming to be represented in the (digital) e-passport with its associated biometric data: a new ‘aesthetic regime’, a new kind of identity, a new condition of state-citizen relations in the supermodern world.

PROJECT iD

Gillian Fuller and Lynne Roberts Goodwin

Supported through 2010 FASS/COFA, UNSW, Faculty Research Grant

‘To what aesthetic regime should one submit?’

In this project we approach this question by focusing on the passport photograph. If W.G Sebald was right, and the passport is the most egregious oppression of modernity (Torpey 2000), what part does the photograph – the aesthetic – play in this act of oppression?

How does this aesthetic operate and how does it shape the way states ‘see’ citizens and citizens ‘see’ themselves? Importantly, the passport photo is also the beginning of biometrics: identity in data (iD). So, moving from the traditional (analogue) passport photo we need to examine how our ‘selves’ are coming to be represented in the (digital) e-passport with its associated biometric data: a new ‘aesthetic regime’, a new kind of identity, a new condition of state-citizen relations in the supermodern world.